The Neuromuscular Disease Network for Canada

funder-logos_nmd4c

COVID-19 and NMD

Download as a PDF

Télécharger au format PDF

 

Le français suit

 

There is an abundance of information available on COVID-19, but little guidance specific to Canadians with neuromuscular disease (NMD), their families, and their caregivers. We at the Neuromuscular Disease Network for Canada (NMD4C) and Muscular Dystrophy Canada (MDC) hope to support the community by compiling this information, recommendations, and links to additional sources. Information is provided to the best of our current knowledge, but recommendations may change as the situation evolves. For tailored advice and treatment, you need to reach out to your health care provider.

If you have any additional questions about COVID-19, please send them to and an NMD expert will respond with an answer shortly. You can find the current answers HERE.

 

About COVID-19

Prevention

COVID-19 in the neuromuscular community

Medication

COVID-19 and neuromuscular disease caregivers

What to do if you feel sick

Impact on ongoing clinical trials

Mental health

Keep updated

Sources

 

***

 

 

 

 

About COVID-19

COVID-19 is an infectious disease in humans caused by a novel coronavirus, similar to other strains of coronavirus that caused the 2012 outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and the 2002 outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). COVID-19 is highly infectious for children and adults as nobody has immunity to the new virus, leading to the rapid spread between people across the globe.

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, fatigue, and dry cough. Infected people may also experience aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat, and diarrhea. Symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually, and about 80% of infected people recover without treatment. However, one in six people with COVID-19 require hospitalization or intensive care due to developing more serious symptoms such as difficulty breathing, pneumonia, or organ failure. Sadly, about 1% of people who contract COVID-19 do not survive, though this risk varies depending on additional factors such as age and health care.

 

Find additional general information about COVID-19 from the World Health Organization HERE.

 

Back to the top

 

 

***

 

 

 

 

Prevention

There is not yet a vaccine or any specific treatment for COVID-19. At this time, the best way to prevent infection is to avoid exposure. COVID-19 spreads when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks, expelling tiny droplets that someone else inhales or that land on a surface that someone else touches.

To avoid person-to-person infection, it is important to self-isolate (i.e., stay in your home) as much as possible. When you must go out, maintain social distancing of at least 2 meters (approximately 2 arm lengths). This distance makes it so that any expelled droplets cannot reach another person. Many people are contagious for weeks before feeling symptoms, so it is crucial to self-isolate and practice social distancing even if you feel well.

To avoid infection from exposed surfaces, frequently and thoroughly wash your hands and disinfect surfaces. Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and water. If soap and water is not available, use alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Do not touch your nose, eyes, or mouth, as this can transmit infection from surfaces you have touched into your body. Wipe surfaces with soap and water first, then with household disinfecting spray or wipes. If these are not available, you can dilute 2 teaspoons of bleach into 4 cups of water to use as surface disinfectant. Pay extra attention to high-touch surfaces such as doorknobs, counters, remote controls, etc.

Cough or sneeze into the bend of your elbow or into a tissue, and then throw out the tissue and wash or sanitize your hands. Facemasks are strongly recommended to be worn by people who are sick, health care providers, and caregivers. Facemasks primarily prevent passing the virus on to vulnerable people.

 

Watch this video by the World Health Organization about preventing the spread of COVID-19 HERE.

Back to the top

 

***

 

 

 

 

COVID-19 in the neuromuscular disease community

It is now recognized that the risk of complications from COVID-19 is high or moderately high for most neuromuscular patients. Generally, people infected with COVID-19 are more at risk of developing complications if they are older, have weakened immune systems, or have underlying chronic medical problems (e.g., heart disease). Neuromuscular patients may also be especially at risk if they:

  • Take oral steroids or other immunosuppressants or are otherwise immunocompromised.
  • Have respiratory complications (e.g., ventilated, Forced Vital Capacity less than 60%, weak cough and weak airway clearance, kyphoscoliosis, congenital myasthenic syndrome, myasthenia gravis)
  • Have cardiac complications
  • Have difficulty swallowing (e.g., myotonic dystrophy, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy)
  • Are at risk of decompensation, deterioration, or rhabdomyolysis during fever, fasting, or infection (e.g., mitochondrial disease)

For neuromuscular patients, the following is recommended:

  • The regular precautions that apply to everyone (e.g., social distancing, handwashing, disinfecting surfaces) are especially important for people with NMD and the people with whom they live.
  • Make sure you are comfortable with the emergency procedures specific to your condition and equipment in case you get sick (e.g., when and how to use your breathing devices, how to deal with adrenal suppression for people on long-term steroids).
  • Make sure you have a good supply of all medication and equipment, ideally 3 months worth. This is especially important for drugs obtained through Health Canada’s Special Access program such as deflazacort. Canadian pharmacies may offer online or telephone ordering and delivery services.
  • Have an alert card on hand to communicate your medical needs and symptoms in case of emergency.
  • Get in touch with your neuromuscular health care provider if you have a specific question or concern (e.g., about your medication).

 

Read additional posts about COVID-19 and NMD by Muscular Dystrophy Canada, World Muscle Society, Muscular Dystrophy UK, EURO-NMD, and European Alliance for Neuromuscular Disorders Associations.

Starting on page 5 in this document is information about COVID-19 for some specific conditions (this does NOT replace discussion with your health care provider).

Read about respiratory support during COVID-19 HERE, and for myotonic dystrophy patients HERE.

Read about COVID-19 and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) HERE.

Watch this 1-hour webinar about COVID-19 and Becker Muscular Dystrophy and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

Read about COVID-19 and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy HERE.

Read about COVID-19 and Myasthenia Gravis and Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome HERE.

Read about COVID-19 and Spinal Muscular Atrophy HERE.

Download this sign for your door notifying visitors or delivery persons of the need for additional precautions at your home.

Back to the top

 

***

 

 

 

 

Medication

Do not take any unproven COVID-19 medications circulating on social media (e.g. chloroquine). These can be particularly dangerous for people with some NMDs. Always talk to your health care provider before making any changes to your medication.

If you are currently taking any medication for your NMD (e.g., steroids), you should continue to take them as normal unless otherwise instructed by your health care provider. Many medications for NMD compromise the immune system which does increase the risk related to viral infections. However, it can be more dangerous to suddenly stop taking prescriptions without medical counsel. The safest course of action is to contact your health care provider to discuss your specific case.

In this time of uncertainty, dangerous information is circulating on social media suggesting that people should try unproven medications to prevent or treat COVID-19. One of these is an anti-malaria medication called chloroquine. Chloroquine has not been proven to help patients with COVID-19. It is important to note that chloroquine may worsen symptoms such as weakness and breathing difficulties in myasthenia gravis patients and people with other neuromuscular transmission disorders such as congenital myasthenic syndromes and Lambert-Eaton syndrome. Any other medication suggested on social media may have dangerous effects that could be even worse for people with NMDs. Please talk to your health care provider before making any changes to your medication. This is good advice for everyone but even more important for people with a neuromuscular condition.

There are also reports circulating online that you should not take ibuprofen or Advil if you have COVID-19, but there is no scientific evidence to back this according to Health Canada. However, you should still follow any guidelines specific to your NMD (e.g., people with Duchenne often should not take ibuprofen, regardless of the presence of a viral infection).

 

Starting on page 17 in this document is some general information about certain medications for NMD (this does NOT replace discussion with your health care provider).

Read this article about medications for hypertension, heart disease, and kidney disease during COVID-19.

Read this article about COVID-19 medications for myasthenia gravis patients.

Back to the top

 

***

 

 

 

 

COVID-19 and neuromuscular disease caregivers

People who provide care for neuromuscular patients, whether professionally or not, need to be extra diligent about following the regular precautions that apply to everyone regarding COVID-19 prevention. This is both because neuromuscular patients may be at higher risk if they were to contract COVID-19, and because professional caregivers may be visiting multiple homes each day. Caregivers should also wear a facemask when in contact with neuromuscular patients, whether or not they feel sick.

Neuromuscular patients and their families should identify a backup caregiver in case their primary caregiver becomes sick. In advance, make sure the backup caregiver has all the information they need to take over care with short notice. Ideally, necessary information should be written down and easily accessible for reference. Necessary information includes:

  • Contact information for your doctors, clinic, pharmacy, etc.
  • Names and doses of all medications

Caregivers should stop working/caregiving immediately if they feel sick.

 

Read more about NMD caregiving during COVID-19 from Muscular Dystrophy Canada and The Ontario Caregiver Organization.

Back to the top

 

***

 

 

 

 

What to do if you feel sick

Neuromuscular patients should promptly seek medical attention if they or someone to whom they have been exposed is identified with symptoms of COVID-19. This is especially important if you normally have lower breathing capacity as COVID-19 may make your breathing even more difficult. Call your health care provider to let them know that you may have been exposed and they will provide guidance about the next steps you should take (e.g., testing, monitoring, seeking in-person medical attention).

If you experience any of the following emergency warning signs, call 911 or go to an emergency room or urgent care facility:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Persistent pain or pressure in your chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Blue lips or face
  • Anything else you find severe or concerning

If you leave your house to seek medical attention, ensure you do the following:

  • Call ahead to give the health care facility advance warning about your symptoms/exposure. If you are going to the hospital, also notify your regular health care provider of the situation.
  • Wear a face mask to help prevent spreading your infection to others.
  • Bring your breathing equipment (labelled with your name and phone number) and know/write down your device settings. You may wish to ask when you call ahead about whether your specific equipment will be welcomed. For example, some devices such as cough assist machines can increase the spread of an infection from you to your environment.
  • If you have myotonic dystrophy, bring this document to provide the health care staff with specific information about your respiratory needs. This information may also be relevant for patients of other NMDs requiring respiratory support.

If you are sick and advised by a medical professional to try recovering at home, stay in one specific room of the house. Other people should only enter the room when necessary and take all the proper precautions when doing so. Pets should not enter the room as we do not yet know if pets can contract COVID-19, and they may increase the spread of the infection within the house.

Back to the top

 

***

 

 

 

 

Impact on ongoing clinical trials

Hospitals across the country are currently prioritizing their resources to fight COVID-19 and take care of other acute, severe, and life-threatening conditions such as heart attacks and strokes. They also need to limit access to the hospital for visitors, out-patients with less severe conditions, study personnel, and trial participants. Moreover, travel to the study site may be restricted or become unsafe. If you or your child are a participant in an active clinical trial, your study doctor and/or study coordinator will likely contact you if any of the following events occur:

  • If a visit to the study site is planned, whether the visit is cancelled, postponed, or changed in any other way such as being replaced by a phone call or telemedicine visit
  • If any changes to your study medication are required
  • If the study has been terminated

You must contact your study doctor and/or study coordinator if any of the following events occur:

  • If you have questions about the study
  • If you feel unwell
  • If you have been diagnosed with or are suspected to have contracted COVID-19
  • If your caregivers or members of your household have been diagnosed with or are suspected to have contracted COVID-19

 

Health Canada provided guidance for Canadian clinical trials during the COVID-19 pandemic HERE.

The FDA provided guidance for American clinical trials during the COVID-19 pandemic HERE.

Back to the top

 

***

 

 

 

 

Mental health

During this COVID-19 pandemic, many people are left feeling quite stressed as they worry about health, finances, school and work deadlines, supplies, and an uncertain future. Please know it is completely normal to feel stress and negative emotions in situations like this. Some strategies for maintaining mental health at this time include:

  • Stay socially connected with phone calls and video chats.
  • Practice mindfulness with your favourite of the many available mindfulness mobile apps.
  • Set specific time limits for scrolling social media and monitoring COVID-19 news. Stop when your time limit is over and focus on other things.
  • Practice deep breathing and/or go for walks outside (while maintaining social distancing).
  • Do not try to avoid or push away negative thoughts or feelings. Acknowledge them, express them, then practice gratitude and positive self-talk.

 

Read posts by Muscular Dystrophy Canada, the Centres for Disease Control, and the Institut National d’Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux about mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read about maintaining social connections while physically distancing HERE.

Back to the top

 

***

 

 

 

 

Keep updated

World Health Organization updates

Government of Canada updates

Government of Alberta updates

Government of British Columbia updates

Government of Manitoba updates

Government of New Brunswick updates

Government of Newfoundland and Labrador updates

Government of Northwest Territories updates

Government of Nova Scotia updates

Government of Nunavut updates

Government of Ontario updates

Government of Prince Edward Island updates

Government of Québec updates

Government of Saskatchewan updates

Government of Yukon updates

 

Back to the top

 

***

 

 

 

 

Sources

Muscular Dystrophy Canada

Muscular Dystrophy UK

Muscular Dystrophy Association

Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy

Ottawa Hospital Neuromuscular Rehabilitation Clinic

Institut National d’Excellence en Santé et en Service Sociaux

World Health Organization

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Back to the top

 

***

 

 

 

 

Le Français

De nombreuses informations sont actuellement disponibles sur la COVID-19, mais peu de conseils spécifiques pour les Canadiens atteints de maladies neuromusculaires (MNM), leurs familles et leurs intervenants de santé. Le Réseau canadien sur les maladies neuromusculaires (NMD4C) et Dystrophie musculaire Canada (DMC) espèrent soutenir la communauté en regroupant ces informations, recommandations et liens vers des sources complémentaires. Les informations présentes dans ce document sont fournies au mieux de nos connaissances actuelles, mais les recommandations peuvent changer en fonction de l’évolution de la situation. Pour obtenir des conseils et des traitements personnalisés, vous devez vous adresser à vos professionnels de la santé.

Si vous avez d’autres questions sur la COVID-19, veuillez les envoyer à et un expert des MNM vous répondra sous peu. Nous utiliserons également vos questions comme guide pour mettre à jour cette page en permanence avec les informations que vous souhaitez et dont vous avez réellement besoin. Vous pouvez trouver les réponses aux questions ICI.

 

À propos de la COVID-19

Prévention

La COVID-19 dans la communauté des maladies neuromusculaires

Médicaments

La COVID-19 et les intervenants spécialisés dans les maladies neuromusculaires

Que faire si vous vous sentez malade

Impact sur les essais cliniques en cours

Santé mentale

Tenez-vous au courant

Sources

 

***

 

 

 

 

À propos de la COVID-19

La COVID-19 est une maladie infectieuse chez l’homme causée par un nouveau type de coronavirus, similaire aux autres souches de coronavirus qui ont causé l’épidémie de 2012 du Syndrome respiratoire du Moyen-Orient (SRMO) et l’épidémie de 2002 du Syndrome respiratoire aigu sévère (SRAS). La COVID-19 est très infectieuse pour les enfants et les adultes car personne n’est immunisé contre le nouveau virus, ce qui entraîne une propagation rapide à travers le monde.

Les symptômes les plus courants de la COVID-19 sont la fièvre, la fatigue et la toux sèche. Les personnes infectées peuvent également ressentir des douleurs, une congestion nasale, un écoulement nasal, un mal de gorge et de la diarrhée. Les symptômes sont généralement légers et commencent progressivement. Environ 80 % des personnes infectées se rétablissent sans traitement. Toutefois, une personne infectée sur six doit être hospitalisée ou recevoir des soins intensifs en raison de l’apparition de symptômes plus graves tels que des difficultés respiratoires, une pneumonie ou une défaillance de certains organes. Malheureusement, environ 1 % des personnes qui contractent la COVID-19 ne survivent pas, bien que ce risque varie en fonction de facteurs supplémentaires tels que l’âge et les soins de santé.

 

Vous trouverez des informations générales supplémentaires sur la COVID-19 auprès de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé ICI.

Retour au Sommet

 

***

 

 

 

 

Prévention

Il n’existe pas encore de vaccin ni de traitement spécifique pour la COVID-19. À l’heure actuelle, la meilleure façon de prévenir l’infection est d’éviter l’exposition au virus.  La COVID-19 se propage lorsqu’une personne infectée tousse, éternue ou parle, expulsant de minuscules gouttelettes qu’une autre personne inhale ou qui atterrissent sur une surface que quelqu’un d’autre touche.

Pour éviter l’infection de personne à personne, isolez-vous (c’est-à-dire restez chez vous) autant que possible. Lorsque vous devez sortir, maintenez une distance sociale d’au moins 2 mètres (environ 2 longueurs de bras). Cette distance permet d’éviter que les gouttelettes expulsées n’atteignent une autre personne. De nombreuses personnes sont contagieuses pendant des semaines avant de ressentir des symptômes, il est donc crucial de s’isoler et de pratiquer la distanciation sociale même si vous vous sentez bien.

Pour éviter l’infection par les surfaces exposées, lavez-vous les mains fréquemment et soigneusement et désinfectez les surfaces. Lavez-vous les mains pendant au moins 20 secondes avec de l’eau et du savon. En l’absence de savon et d’eau, utilisez un désinfectant pour les mains à base d’alcool contenant au moins 60 % d’alcool. Ne vous touchez pas le nez, les yeux ou la bouche, car cela peut transmettre à votre corps l’infection provenant des surfaces que vous avez touchées. Essuyez d’abord les surfaces avec de l’eau et du savon, puis avec un vaporisateur désinfectant ou des lingettes. Si vous ne disposez pas de ces produits, vous pouvez diluer 2 cuillères à café d’eau de javel dans 4 tasses d’eau pour utiliser ce produit comme désinfectant de surface. Portez une attention particulière aux surfaces à contacts élevés telles que les poignées de porte, les comptoirs, les télécommandes, etc.

Toussez ou éternuez dans le pli de votre coude ou dans un mouchoir en papier, puis jetez le mouchoir et lavez-vous ou désinfectez vos mains. Il est fortement recommandé aux personnes malades, aux intervenants de la santé et aux aides-soignants de porter un masque. Les masques empêchent principalement de transmettre le virus aux personnes vulnérables.

 

Regardez cette vidéo de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé sur la prévention de la propagation de la COVID-19 (en anglais seulement).

Retour au Sommet

 

***

 

 

 

 

La COVID-19 dans la communauté des maladies neuromusculaires

Il est maintenant reconnu que le risque de complications de la COVID-19 est élevé ou modérément élevé pour la plupart des patients neuromusculaires.  Comme la COVID-19 peut causer des difficultés respiratoires, les patients atteints de maladies neuromusculaires constituent probablement un groupe à risque plus élevé, car ils peuvent déjà avoir des muscles respiratoires ou cardiaques affaiblis.

En général, les personnes infectées par la COVID-19 sont plus susceptibles de développer des complications si elles sont plus âgées, ont un système immunitaire affaibli ou ont des problèmes médicaux chroniques sous-jacents (par exemple, une maladie cardiaque). Les patients atteints de maladies neuromusculaires peuvent également être particulièrement à risque s’ils

  • prennent des stéroïdes ou d’autres immunosuppresseurs par voie orale ou sont autrement immunosupprimés
  • présentent des complications respiratoires (par exemple, ventilation, capacité vitale forcée inférieure à 60 %, faible toux et faible dégagement des voies respiratoires, cyphoscoliose, syndrome myasthénique congénital, myasthénie grave)
  • Avoir des complications cardiaques
  • Avoir des difficultés à avaler (par exemple, dystrophie myotonique, dystrophie musculaire oculopharyngée)
  • sont exposés à un risque de décompensation, de détérioration ou de rhabdomyolyse pendant la fièvre, le jeûne, ou l’infection (par exemple, maladie mitochondriale)

Pour les patients neuromusculaires, il est recommandé de procéder comme suit :

  • Les précautions régulières qui s’appliquent à tous (par exemple, l’isolement social, le lavage des mains, la désinfection des surfaces) sont particulièrement importantes pour les personnes atteintes de MNM et les personnes en contact.
  • Assurez-vous que vous êtes à l’aise avec les procédures d’urgence spécifiques à votre état et avec l’équipement en cas de maladie (par exemple, quand et comment utiliser vos appareils respiratoires, comment traiter la suppression des surrénales pour les personnes sous stéroïdes à long terme).
  • Assurez-vous d’avoir une bonne réserve de tous les médicaments et équipements, idéalement pour une durée de 3 mois, et plus particulièrement important pour les médicaments obtenus par le biais du programme d’accès spécial de Santé Canada, comme le deflazacort. Les pharmacies canadiennes peuvent offrir des services de commande et de livraison en ligne ou par téléphone.
  • Ayez en main une carte d’alerte pour communiquer vos besoins médicaux et vos symptômes en cas d’urgence.
  • Communiquez avec vos professionnels de la santé de votre clinique neuromusculaire si vous avez une question ou une préoccupation particulière (par exemple, au sujet de vos médicaments).

 

Lisez des articles supplémentaires sur COVID-19 et NMD par Dystrophie musculaire Canada, World Muscle Society, Muscular Dystrophy UK, EURO-NMD et European Alliance for Neuromuscular Disorders Associations. Vous trouverez à partir de la page 5 du ce document des informations sur la COVID-19 pour certaines affections spécifiques (cela ne remplace PAS la discussion avec votre professionnel de la santé) (en anglais seulement).

Lisez sur la COVID-19 et la ventilatoire à domicile ICI, et pour les patients atteints de dystrophie myotonique ICI.

Lisez sur la COVID-19 et la sclérose latérale amyotrophique (SLA) ICI.

Webinar sur la COVID-19 et la dystrophie musculaire de Becker et la dystrophie musculaire de Duchenne ICI (en anglais seulement).

Pour en savoir plus sur COVID-19 et la dystrophie musculaire de Duchenne, cliquez ICI.

Pour en savoir plus sur COVID-19 et la myasthénie grave et le syndrome myasthénique de Lambert-Eaton, cliquez ICI.

Pour en savoir plus sur la COVID-19 et l’Atrophie musculaire spinale, cliquez ICI.

Téléchargez ce panneau pour votre porte afin d’informer les visiteurs ou les livreurs de la nécessité de prendre des précautions supplémentaires à votre domicile.

Retour au Sommet

 

***

 

 

 

 

Médicaments

Ne prenez aucun médicament COVID non approuvé circulant sur les médias sociaux (par exemple la chloroquine) – ils peuvent être particulièrement dangereux pour les personnes atteintes de certaines MNM. Parlez toujours à votre professionnel de la santé pour tout médicament.

Si vous prenez actuellement des médicaments pour votre MNM (par exemple, des stéroïdes), vous devez continuer à les prendre normalement, sauf indication contraire de votre professionnel de la santé. De nombreux médicaments pour la MNM compromettent le système immunitaire, ce qui augmente le risque lié aux infections virales. Cependant, il peut être plus dangereux de cesser soudainement de prendre des médicaments sur ordonnance sans avis médical. Le plus sûr est de contacter votre intervenant de santé pour discuter de votre cas particulier.

En cette période d’incertitude, des informations dangereuses circulent sur les médias sociaux, suggérant que les gens devraient essayer des médicaments non approuvés pour prévenir ou traiter la COVID-19. L’un d’entre eux est un médicament antipaludéen appelé chloroquine. Il n’a pas été prouvé que la chloroquine aide les patients atteints de COVID-19. Il est important de noter que la chloroquine peut aggraver des symptômes tels que la faiblesse et les difficultés respiratoires chez les patients atteints de myasthénie grave et les personnes souffrant d’autres maladies neuromusculaire transmissibles tels que les syndromes myasthéniques congénitaux et le syndrome de Lambert-Eaton. Tout autre médicament suggéré sur les médias sociaux peut avoir des effets dangereux qui pourraient être encore plus graves pour les personnes atteintes de MNM. Veuillez consulter votre médecin spécialiste avant d’apporter des modifications à votre médication – c’est un bon conseil pour tout le monde, mais encore plus important pour les personnes atteintes d’une maladie neuromusculaire.

Des rapports circulant en ligne indiquent que vous ne devez pas prendre d’ibuprofène ou d’Advil si vous êtes atteint de la COVID-19, mais il n’existe aucune preuve scientifique à l’appui selon Santé Canada. Cependant, vous devriez quand même suivre les directives spécifiques à votre MNM (par exemple, les personnes atteintes de la maladie de Duchenne ne devraient souvent pas prendre d’ibuprofène, quelle que soit la présence d’une infection virale ou non).

 

Vous trouverez à partir de la page 17 du ce document des informations générales sur certains médicaments utilisés auprès des personnes atteintes de MNM (cela ne remplace PAS la discussion avec votre intervenant de santé) (en anglais seulement).

Lisez cet article sur les médicaments contre l’hypertension, les maladies cardiaques et les maladies rénales pendant la COVID-19.

Lisez cet article sur les médicaments COVID-19 pour les patients souffrant de myasthénie grave.

Retour au Sommet

 

 

***

 

 

 

 

La COVID-19 et les intervenants spécialisés dans les maladies neuromusculaires

Les personnes qui prodiguent des soins aux personnes atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires, qu’elles soient des professionnelles de la santé ou non, doivent faire preuve d’une vigilance accrue pour respecter les précautions habituelles qui s’appliquent à tous en matière de prévention de la COVID-19. Cela s’explique par le fait que les patients atteints de maladies neuromusculaires peuvent être plus exposés aux risques s’ils contractent la COVID-19, et par le fait que les intervenants de la santé peuvent visiter plusieurs foyers chaque jour. Les intervenants doivent également porter un masque lorsqu’ils sont en contact avec des patients neuromusculaires, qu’ils se sentent malades ou non.

Les patients atteints de maladies neuromusculaires et leurs familles doivent identifier un intervenant en remplacement au cas où leur intervenant principal tomberait malade. Assurez-vous à l’avance que l’intervenant en remplacement dispose de toutes les informations dont il a besoin pour prendre en charge les soins dans les plus brefs délais. Idéalement, les informations nécessaires devraient être consignées par écrit et facilement accessibles pour référence. Les informations nécessaires sont les suivantes :

  • Les coordonnées de votre médecin, de votre clinique, de votre pharmacie, etc.
  • Les noms et les doses de tous les médicaments

Les aidants doivent cesser de travailler ou de s’occuper d’un proche immédiatement s’ils se présentent des symptômes ou se sentent malades.

 

Lisez ces posts par Dystrophie Musculaire Canada (en anglais seulement) et par Organisme de Soutien aux Aidants Naturels de l’Ontario sur les soins MNM pendant la COVID-19.

Retour au Sommet

 

***

 

 

 

 

Que faire si vous vous sentez malade

Les patients atteints de maladies neuromusculaires doivent rapidement consulter un médecin si eux-mêmes ou une personne à laquelle ils ont été exposés présentent des symptômes de la COVID-19. Ceci est particulièrement important si vous avez normalement une capacité respiratoire plus faible, car la COVID-19 peut rendre votre respiration encore plus difficile. Appelez votre intervenant de santé pour lui faire savoir que vous avez peut-être été exposé et il vous donnera des conseils sur les prochaines étapes à suivre (par exemple, faire des tests, surveiller, demander des soins médicaux en personne).

Si vous ressentez l’un des signes d’alerte suivants, appelez le 911 ou rendez-vous dans une salle d’urgence:

  • Difficulté à respirer ou essoufflement
  • Douleur ou pression persistantes dans la poitrine
  • Nouvelle confusion ou incapacité à en revenir
  • Lèvres ou visage bleus
  • Tout autre élément que vous trouvez grave ou préoccupant

Si vous quittez votre domicile pour vous faire soigner, assurez-vous de faire ce qui suit :

  • Appelez à l’avance pour prévenir l’établissement de soins de vos symptômes/exposition. Si vous vous rendez à l’hôpital, informez également votre intervenant de santé habituel de la situation.
  • Portez un masque facial pour éviter de propager votre infection à d’autres personnes.
  • Apportez votre équipement respiratoire (étiqueté avec votre nom et votre numéro de téléphone) et connaissez/écrivez les réglages de votre appareil. Lorsque vous appelez à l’avance, vous pouvez demander si votre équipement spécifique sera le bienvenu. Par exemple, certains appareils tels que les appareils d’aide à la toux peuvent accroître la propagation d’une infection de votre part à votre environnement.
  • Si vous souffrez de dystrophie myotonique, apportez ce document pour fournir au personnel de santé des informations spécifiques sur vos besoins respiratoires. Ces informations peuvent également être utiles aux patients d’autres MNM nécessitant une assistance respiratoire.
  • Si vous êtes malade et qu’un professionnel de la santé vous conseille d’essayer de vous rétablir à la maison, restez dans une pièce spécifique de la maison. Les autres personnes ne doivent entrer dans cette pièce qu’en cas de nécessité et prendre toutes les précautions nécessaires. Les animaux domestiques ne doivent pas entrer dans la chambre, car nous ne savons pas encore si les animaux peuvent contracter la COVID-19, et ils peuvent accroître la propagation de l’infection dans la maison.

 

Retour au Sommet

 

***

 

 

 

 

Impact sur les essais cliniques en cours

Les hôpitaux de tout le pays donnent actuellement la priorité à leurs ressources pour lutter contre la COVID-19 et prendre en charge d’autres affections aiguës, graves et potentiellement mortelles comme les crises cardiaques et les accidents vasculaires cérébraux. Ils doivent également limiter l’accès à l’hôpital pour les visiteurs, les patients externes souffrant de maladies moins graves, le personnel de l’étude et les participants aux essais. En outre, les déplacements vers le site de l’étude peuvent être limités ou devenir dangereux. Si vous ou votre enfant participez à un essai clinique, votre médecin et/ou le coordinateur de l’étude vous contactera probablement si l’un des événements suivants se produit :

  • Si une visite sur le site de l’étude est prévue, si la visite est annulée, reportée ou modifiée de toute autre manière, par exemple en étant remplacée par un appel téléphonique ou une visite de télémédecine
  • Si des modifications doivent être apportées à votre médicament d’étude
  • Si l’étude a été interrompue

Vous devez contacter votre médecin et/ou votre coordinateur d’études si l’un des événements suivants se produit :

  • Si vous avez des questions concernant l’étude
  • Si vous ne vous sentez pas bien
  • Si vous avez été diagnostiqué ou si vous êtes soupçonné d’avoir contracté la COVID-19
  • Si vos intervenants ou les membres de votre foyer ont été diagnostiqués ou sont soupçonnés d’avoir contracté la COVID-19

 

Santé Canada a fourni des conseils pour les essais cliniques canadiens durant la pandémie COVID-19 ICI.

La FDA a fourni des conseils pour les essais cliniques américains pendant la pandémie COVID-19 ICI.

Retour au Sommet

 

***

 

 

 

 

Santé mentale

Pendant cette pandémie COVID-19, de nombreuses personnes se sentent très stressées, car elles s’inquiètent pour leur santé, leurs finances, les échéances scolaires et professionnelles, les fournitures et un avenir incertain. Sachez qu’il est tout à fait normal de ressentir du stress et des émotions négatives dans des situations comme celle-ci. Voici quelques stratégies pour préserver la santé mentale en ce moment :

  • Restez en contact social grâce aux appels téléphoniques et aux chats vidéo.
  • Pratiquez la méditation avec votre application mobile préférée parmi les nombreuses applications disponibles pour la méditation.
  • Fixez des délais précis pour faire défiler les médias sociaux et suivre l’actualité de la COVID-19. Arrêtez-vous lorsque votre limite de temps est dépassée et concentrez-vous sur d’autres choses.
  • Pratiquez la respiration profonde et/ou faites des promenades à l’extérieur (tout en gardant une distance sociale).
  • N’essayez pas d’éviter ou de repousser les pensées ou les sentiments négatifs. Reconnaissez-les, exprimez-les, puis pratiquez la gratitude et le dialogue intérieur positif.

 

Lisez les articles de Dystrophie musculaire Canada, des Centres de contrôle des maladies et de l’Institut national d’excellence en santé et en services sociaux sur la santé mentale durant la pandémie COVID-19.

Lisez les articles sur le maintien des liens sociaux tout en vous éloignant physiquement ICI.

Retour au Sommet

 

***

 

 

 

 

Tenez-vous au courant

Mises à jour de l’Organisation mondiale de la santé

Mises à jour du gouvernement du Canada

Mises à jour du gouvernement de l’Alberta

Mises à jour du gouvernement de la Colombie-Britannique

Mises à jour du gouvernement du Manitoba

Mises à jour du gouvernement du Nouveau-Brunswick

Mises à jour du gouvernement de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador

Mises à jour du gouvernement des Territoires du Nord-Ouest

Mises à jour du gouvernement de la Nouvelle-Écosse

Mises à jour du gouvernement du Nunavut

Mises à jour du gouvernement de l’Ontario

Mises à jour du gouvernement de l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard

Mises à jour du gouvernement du Québec

Mises à jour du gouvernement de la Saskatchewan

Mises à jour du gouvernement du Yukon

Retour au Sommet

 

***

 

 

 

 

Sources

Dystrophie musculaire Canada

Dystrophie musculaire UK

Association contre la dystrophie musculaire

Projet des parents sur la dystrophie musculaire

Clinique de réadaptation neuromusculaire de l’hôpital d’Ottawa

Institut National d’Excellence en Santé et en Service Sociaux

Organisation mondiale de la santé

Centres de contrôle et de prévention des maladies

 

 

Retour au Sommet

 

virus-4915859_1920

Read next...

email-3249062_1280

December 2020 newsletter

The December 2020 issue of the NMD4C newsletter is now available! Topics include: An update from the Canadian Biobanking landscape, an update on our clinical curriculum development, NMD4C’s Annual Investigator Meeting, job opportunities, our recent and upcoming webinars, new research from NMD4C participants and a member spotlight on investigator Dr. Craig Campbell.

Door sign saying "we are hiring"

Job Opportunity | Pediatric Neurologist at CHEO

The NMD4C is excited to share an employment opportunity with CHEO’s growing pediatric neuromuscular team in Ottawa!

CHEO’s Division of Neurology and uOttawa’s Department of Pediatrics  are seeking a Pediatric Neurologist to join their existing six-member team which participates in research and educational activities as well as the clinical inpatient and outpatient services offered by the Division.

Oct_webinar title

CPD-Accredited NMD4C Webinar | Up and Coming Stars in NMD | December 1st

Up and Coming Stars in NMD Muscular Dystrophy Canada (MDC) and the Neuromuscular Disease Network for Canada (NMD4C) are pleased to invite you to a webinar on up and coming stars in NMD. This webinar is primarily targeted at Canadian clinicians, academics and trainees with an interest in neuromuscular disease. NMD4C and MDC are providing…

MDC rapid research rounds

MDC Webinar: Rapid Research Rounds | Muscular Dystrophy Canada 2020 Neuromuscular Conference

Rapid Research Rounds This session is an introduction to the 12 latest MDC funded research awardees. The projects span from early discovery, translational and clinical research as well as address critical gaps in Canada’s ecosystem. All of these projects were selected through competitive medical and scientific peer review process and have recently started. You will…

James comms coordinator

NMD4C Hire New Communications Coordinator

New Communications Coordinator The NMD4C are pleased to announce the hiring of their new communications coordinator, James Davis. James holds a Masters degree in Human Kinetics, and holds previous network creation experience. Through his efforts to help build a national Sport Safety framework, James has a skillset well-suited to the role. He also has research…

email-3249062_1280

November 2020 newsletter

The November 2020 issue of the NMD4C newsletter is now available!

Topics include an introduction to NMD4C’s new communications and administrative coordinator, what KT services and consulting you would like the NMD4C to offer, Muscular Dystrophy Canada’s upcoming virtual neuromuscular conference, our recent and upcoming webinars, new research from NMD4C participants, and a member spotlight on investigator Dr. Bernard Brais.